While many financial advisors feel the need to advance or continue their education, they often experience a common obstacle: their job, or rather the hours in a week monopolized by a demanding career. Fortunately, time restraints don’t need to be an obstacle in your educational journey.

Many financial planning courses for advanced designations can be taken at your own pace without significantly disrupting your job or your life. If you’re interested in pursuing an advanced financial education, consider these options before deciding on an institution or program.

 financial planning courses

Self-Study

Understandably, many financial advisors want to avoid the potential stress of balancing coursework with both work and home responsibilities, and self-study programs provide ample scheduling flexibility. Self-study courses allow you to carve out time when it works best for you to both study and take examinations. This flexibility allows students to have the best of both worlds: they can take financial planning courses without infringing on their work schedule and, in many cases, are able to complete self-study courses faster than they could traditional classes.

Webinar Classes

While self-study is an attractive option for some, other financial advisors crave structure and may have trouble meeting deadlines or staying motivated with independent courses. Working at your own pace and around your schedule means that there’s always the temptation to forgo studies for other professional or personal priorities. These structure-seekers often benefit more from taking scheduled webinar classes.

Webinar courses can be described as a hybrid between self-study and traditional classes. During live webinars, financial planners receive in-depth and customized instruction from professors and enjoy a more disciplined instructional approach afforded by a fixed schedule for each financial planning course. And, to help students prepare for exams and review content later on, most webinar classes will provide recordings of the lecture as well as other valuable study materials.

Online and Offline Resources

Regardless of your learning style and preferred approach, it's important that the educational program you enroll in provides sufficient resources for your success. Before committing to any curriculum, see if the program offers an online learning center to supplement the materials of each individual class as well as resources, such as practice tests, audio and video reviews, and online forums. Finally, sometimes you’ll need or want access to professional counselors and industry experts who can help you stay the course on meeting your education goals while also providing advice, instructions or materials to assist your studies.

The American College of Financial Services

For financial professionals committed to earning an advanced designation while also pursuing a full time career, the opportunity to learn your way is essential.

The College’s webinar and  self-study programs allow students to efficiently pursue an advanced financial designation such as the  ChFC®, CFP®, RICP®, or CLU® at your own pace. Classes and course materials are created by thought leaders and renowned educators in the financial industry. These programs are supplemented by practice tests, review materials, archives of past lectures and lessons, and all necessary resources to ensure you complete your financial planning courses in a timely manner, all without disrupting your existing personal and professional life.

The American College of Financial Services provides program options for completing financial planning courses so you can continue working without complication. Even better, many advisors find their practice positively impacted through the duration of designation curriculum as they are able to immediately apply practical knowledge to to their existing business. To find out more about how these classes can help you accelerate your career, take a look at the complimentary  guide, 6 Ways an Advanced Financial Designation Helps Grow Your Practice.

Want to grow your practice? Take the first step with a financial advisor designation. Download your guide.

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